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                                          1. Index - - - 2. Overview - - - 3. The Scientific Basis - - - 4. The CO2 Harvesting System Technology - - -  5. CO2 Disposal Well Technology 

    __________________________________________________________   4. The CO2 Harvesting System Technology   ________________________________________________________________

Description Of A CO2 Harvesting Farm Area Big Enough To Stop The Entire World's Climate Change: 
(See Example Below)
21,736 2 mile x 2 mile (4-square-mile) plots of arid land.  About the same land area as Minnesota - (86,943 square miles).

5,280 sq = 27,878,400 x 4 = 111,513,600 sq ft/plot


Thousands of Direct Air CO2 Capture farm plots all over the World feeding hundreds of Class VI CO2 Disposal Wells.
            
       
(Left) One example of scaling up agriculture. (Center) Note Saudi Arabia's cluster of early opportunity red dots. Saudi Arabia might have favorable terrain, sub-surface strata, and climate. (Right, Saudi Arabia). (Far Right,) Class IV Disposal Well.

One very rough estimate indicated 21,736 2 by 2 -mile-square plots (about 86,943 square miles, 4 inch thick), with each plot harvested at the rate of .01 square mile per day, 365 days per year, would be needed to stop climate change in it's tracks. 
This was an estimate made to determine the pebble mass dwell of a 100 foot wide harvester. (Recall: Today's airplanes don't look much like the first airplanes.)  Check back for both revisions and corrections. 
(1.050.01)

          
Global Positioning System Controlled Self-Driving Harvester COMBINE
 does a combination of precision harvesting tasks at one time - such as cutting, shelling the corn, putting it in a hopper, disposing of the stalk stover.

This page was inspired by the Modern Marvels video: Harvesting Technology Feeds the World (S11, E49) | Full Episode | History   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KebnHpNXV0k 

 The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a U.S.-owned utility that provides users with positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) services. This system consists of three segments: the space segment, the control segment, and the user segment.
(The above images of common off-the-shelf farm combine harvesting equipment are "standing in" for future images of yet-to-be-engineered perhaps 100 foot wide Climate Change combine harvesting machinery. They would never travel on roads. Located only in dry deserts, they would be supported by tanker trucks during the inactive night hours. Tracked vehicles steer by doing maneuvers called "Skid-Steer or Neutral Steer" and could be parked overnight in sheds the size of small airplane hangars.)

How about a stiff plastic screen laying on basket-ball sized rocks as a surface for CO2-loaded magnesium carbonate pebbles to weather and to support a broad-tracked CO2 harvester?
When weathered, the pebbles would be vacuumed up into a mobile calciner, their CO2 extracted, and, after cooling, the resulting magnesium oxide pebbles would then be returned to the plastic screen covered rocks?

A 100 foot-wide mobile calciner might resemble one of today's GPS-guided swing-arm corn or wheat harvesters and be able to precisely process 100 foot wide swaths of magnesium carbonate pebbles at a walking pace. This is how wheat farmers tackle Minnesota-size wheat harvests.  It would have to be able to harvest 1 square mile in a 10 hour day.

Check out this sweeper demo idea as a way to corral and vacuum up weathered magnesite pebbles for calciner reprocessing:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEXxtVRzXxg  
    (Please Visit)

Warning! When fresh, these CO2-capturing pebbles are caustic magnesium.    Once they have absorbed their fill of air's CO2, they are no longer caustic.    Airtight combine cabs may be needed.

 

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A Practical CO2 Harvesting Combine and a Support Station - Hundreds Will Be Needed

Block Diagram of A Suggested CO2 Harvesting Combine to Remove Climate Change CO2 From the Air

(The mechanism for gathering and re-spreading the pebbles has not been worked out in detail yet.)

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Below taken from a farmer's internet discussion page.

CORN HARVESTER COMBINE Footprint area and typical speed in miles per hour.

 Accordingly, how fast can a combine harvest?

The average speed of the combine is 4 miles per hour. We are able to pick between 50 and 75 acres of corn in one day, or 100 acres of soybeans in one day. We usually combine 10 to 14 hours on a warm, dry day, but we've been known to go longer (4 a.m.!) to avoid adverse weather conditions.

Secondly, how does a combine pick corn? Harvesting. After it matures, corn is harvested in the fall with a grain combine. Combines have row dividers that pick up the corn stalks as the combine moves through the field. The corn ears are broken off from the corn stalk and dragged into the combine, and the stalks are dropped back on the ground.

Also to know, how fast do you combine corn?

? Most of the time in "normal" years 3-4 mph. This year with all of the down corn 2-3 mph is more like it.

How many acres can you combine in an hour?

A combine doing 21.8 acres/hr (8.8 ha/hr) will fill it's 320 (11.25m3) bushel hopper every 11 minutes. With two combines in the field, we can estimate that each combine will average about 2 minutes of down time waiting for the truck to come to unload.

 

I have a 9510 combine with a 644 corn head. It is 38 inch spaced. Our corn will usually average between 160 and 210 bu.

My question is: How fast do some of you run a comparable sized combine in these conditions? I usually run 3.5 to 4 mph. Can I push it harder? It never seems to be under a load. Only thing, would my losses be higher if I really "let er rip". I am a cotton farmer who is still getting his combine setting down pat. Only wish I knew as much about setting a combine as i do about setting a cotton picker.

 
 
 
Open the top sieve as open as u can.. till the tailings start to suck.. you can go as fast as u want if the combine osnt dumping it out the back..

The faster you go, the better will will run by getting more grain on grain threshing if its dry. Before you get all nuts, have an employee or someone with u to watch behind the combine as You are running at the different speeds to check for loss and to know where its coming from if there is any.

4 mph is a good speed for all around harvest. But if the combine will handle 6 and
you are not loading the machine too much or loosing too much... go for it.
 

Registered
 
 
like farmer jones says. it all starts at the head.

on the current corn futures i will be driving as slow as i can stand, at 7$corn if i can slow the head all the way down and drop 1mph on the combine its more than worth it.

if on flat ground and dryer corn you could drive a lot faster if you wanted before it pulls the engine down. but like
I am saying, harvest is not a race when prices are what they are. Every kernel out the back is money not in your pocket.

Make sure you set your stripper plates for the stalks and ear size. Get out of the combine through out the day to check head and combine loss to tune loss's to a minimum.
 
Thanks for the info. I will give it a try. One more question: Do you set the deck plates closer than the Deere specs in the operators manual?
 
You will want to set your deck plates according to your conditions. A guideline I have heard is that you set them so that a shelled cob will not quite fit through them. Theory is that if the cob can fit between the plates you will have more shelling on the head. Big thing is that you have a 1/16" or so more gap in the rear than in the front of the plates, which the book should tell you. The balance is between saving corn and limiting the amount of residue you take into the combine. Before you get too much into the task of readjusting them (if they are not hydraulic), make sure they are not worn out...if they are worn out they will not have a straight edge anymore and there will be a wider gap in the middle. In that case, replace them and adjust them as you put them on.

For setting the combine for corn, here's some guidelines we follow for a 9610: set the concave so that you are seeing a few broken cobs, but no splits, then set the cylinder speed so that you are getting it all off (which means that you will occasionally see a kernel or two on a cob in the walkers during a power shut-down). Set your fan at the highest speed and leave it. Set lower sieve to how clean you want your corn...it's usually open a couple more notches than book setting otherwise the corn can't get through it fast enough in high bushel yields and it will overload the tailings. Then, start with the chaffer opened up beyond book setting and close it down as necessary, but not so far that you have corn going over. Set the precleaner according to book or so that only clean corn goes through, and the extension you can set according to book or I have already just left it closed.

I agree with the posts above that the head settings and condition are very important.

Accordingly, how fast can a combine harvest?

The average speed of the combine is 4 miles per hour. We are able to pick between 50 and 75 acres of corn in one day, or 100 acres of soybeans in one day. We usually combine 10 to 14 hours on a warm, dry day, but we've been known to go longer (4 a.m.!) to avoid adverse weather conditions.

How many acres can you combine in an hour?

A combine doing 21.8 acres/hr (8.8 ha/hr) will fill it's 320 (11.25m3) bushel hopper every 11 minutes. With two combines in the field, we can estimate that each combine will average about 2 minutes of down time waiting for the truck to come to unload.

 

 

 

 

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Farming and Harvesting Carbon Dioxide From The Air As A Cash Crop

What Will the Pebble Handling, Tilling, and Harvesting Machinery Look Like?
This sweeper demo idea to recover weathered magnesite pebbles for calciner reprocessing:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEXxtVRzXxg  
    (Please Visit)
It would certainly be much more efficient for mobile harvesting machinery to go to the CO2 rather than hauling a 90 mile square of loose pebbles to a central processing plant.
Many smaller harvesting machines going over smaller fields of pebbles.
Asian farm machinery builders are likely to come up with the best early field machinery designs for this application.
A large powered magnesium carbonate harvester might be smaller than a semi trailer and it could do a linear sweep. Gasoline-sized tank trucks could bring fuels and liquid oxygen and carry away the liquefied CO2.
Or perhaps a chemical processing site on a 100 foot wide 1/4 mile long bridge mounted on railroad tracks or a huge crawler like that machine used at Cape Canaveral to haul large rockets from the assembly building to the major Launch Pads.
Many smaller scale iterations of the machinery will need to be made at first to find the most efficient designs and construction techniques. 
Recall the enormous bursts of construction that has occurred in times of vigorous economic expansion such as the massive economic competition between Capitalism and Communism that occurred after World War II?

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Once CO2 mitigation and CO2 burial halts the current adding of fresh CO2 to the atmosphere,
it will begin removing the 500+ billion ton historic cloud of CO
2 in the air we call 'Climate Change'.
This begins the real process of cooling Planet Earth back down to normal.

Notice all the cities burning fuels to make all the different energies mankind must have to live well?

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More Climate Change Cleverness: How Others Are Doing It

https://www.1pointfive.com/about

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